Paying for care

 
The paying for care system is complex, with various ‘ifs’ and ‘maybes’. Here, We explains it in simple detail so that you can understand whether you might need to pay towards your care at home or in a care home.

If you have already had a care needs assessment, and you have social care needs that are eligible for support from your council, you will be offered a financial assessment.

If a local authority provides or arranges services for you, you may be asked to contribute towards the cost of care at home or in a care home, depending on your circumstances.

Financial assessment for social care

To see whether you will need to contribute towards the cost of your care and support, your council will conduct a financial assessment. This will look at your:

Capital – for example, any property you own, bonds and shares

Savings – any savings you have in bank accounts

Income – including benefits, pension and any income you might get from a job

Most people will have to pay something towards the cost of their care.

Is my home included?

The value of your home is included as part of your capital in the social care financial assessment if you are moving into residential care, except in limited circumstances. It is not included if you are receiving care in your own home.


Is my home included?

The value of your home is included as part of your capital in the social care financial assessment if you are moving into residential care, except in limited circumstances. It is not included if you are receiving care in your own home.

If you want to know whether you will need to sell your home to pay for your care, read our information on deferred payment agreements.

How much do I have to pay for care?

If you choose not to have a financial care assessment, you will be responsible for paying the full cost of your care and support.

If you have income, capital and savings of less than £14,250, you may be asked to contribute part of your income and the local authority may pay the rest.

If you have income, capital and savings between £14,250 and £23,250, you are likely to have to contribute towards the cost of your care. You may need to contribute part of your income. People are usually asked to pay £1 for each £250 they have in capital and savings above £14,250.

If your capital and savings amount to more than £23,250, you will probably have to pay the full cost of your care yourself.

Running out of money

If you are worried about running out of money because of paying for care, speak to your council. They will want to give you a care assessment and a financial assessment if your savings are likely to reduce to £23,250 through payment of care home fees.

You should let the council know well in advance so that you can plan for your care fees together. However, bear in mind that the local authority must undertake an assessment of your needs and financial circumstances before deciding if it can contribute towards the cost of your care.

You might want to read our information on third party payments for social care if:

The council doesn’t already pay for your care but might in the future

You are living in a care home that costs more than the council will pay for your needs

You have a home care service that costs more than the council says it will pay

If the council is going to start paying towards your care and one of these applies to you, a third party payment may help you avoid moving to a new care home or from changing care service.

Understanding your rights before moving into care is essential and there are several financial products and specialist companies that may be able to help.

You should look at getting financial and legal advice before you decide on how to fund your care.
 

Domiciliary Care Insurance 

AVIVA Summary of Cover: Employers Liability @ 10 million of Indemnity – Public Liability @ 10 million Limit of Indemnity – Professional Indemnity @ 2 million Limit of Indemnity – Includes cover for Liabilities arising from any error or omission by the Insured in the provision of nursing care, first aid and administration of medication – Liability for theft of customer's property by employees – Limit £25000.00

Kasia d'Orgee – Registered Service Provider British Master Degree – Revalidation of the Chronically Sick and Handicapped 18 years experience and 10 more years experience in the UK
Tobiasz Wojciechowski - Director
Malgorzata Pawlak - Registered Manager, 11 years experience in care